Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Great Sage Goes Vegan, Acc'd To Dining@Large

Great Sage -- the Clarksville restaurant known for vegetarian cuisine -- went completely vegan on January 1, according to Laura Vozzella on Dining @ Large.

Vozzella correctly notes that it isn't an enormous change because 90% of the menu had been vegan.  They just removed the dairy options, including a cheese-based mac-n-cheese.  If you're interested in food around here, Dining @ Large remains a nice option -- even though (Elizabeth) Large is dining as a civilian now.

5 comments:

Clayton said...

I'm not going to be a big fan of a strictly vegan menu, but I did have some vegan pancakes at Sage that were as good as any other pancakes.

ivegan said...

@ Clayton... Did you know that in order to have milk the cow needs to be artificially impregnated, than the calf needs to be taken from her after birth and then killed, so the cow can be attached to automatic pipes draining her milk and then nicely packed and sold as smiling cow milk? The stress that the cow goes after losing a baby goes straight to the milk or cheese people eat... not mentioning the lack of ethics or simple heart...

K8teebug said...

For a vegan restaurant, there are hardly any tofu entrees. Disappointing. But, really, that's my only complaint about the place. Their food is good.

Marcia said...

Ivegan, I think someone badly misinformed you about diary cows. My grandparents owned a small dairy farm and I spent many long summers there. The cows ate grass and produced milk. That's all there was to it. Those cows were NEVER artificially impregnated. I can guarantee it. Every summer one or two cows had calves the natural way, and that calf either stayed on the farm or was sold to another diary farm. Not killed. Not bred to stimulate milk production.

Informer said...

Marcia, that's a great anecdote for why people should perhaps support small farms in their purchase of dairy products. However, what you buy at the store comes from factory farms, which are not accustomed to the storybook like you have described.

Even local farms rely on artificial insemination and, as their main business is dairy, nonproducers (males) are superfluous and slaughtered, not kept for pets.

Time to leave grandma's place and see meat and milk production for what it really is. Still choosing to consume meat and dairy is perhaps a defensible position, however, ignorance of its origins is not.